Past Events

View past seminars and other events sponsored by the department of Economics. Events can be viewed by date or filtered by seminar series. 

Additionally, view the drop down menu on the left.

Date & TimeSeminar SeriesSpeaker and Title
April 16, 202112:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Rik Steckel (Ohio State University) - "Rapid Economic Growth and Type II Diabetes: Dreadful Unintended Consequences"
April 16, 202112:00 PM - 1:00 PMFeed Your Mind: "The lasting impacts of school shootings" with Professor Molly SchnellJoin Professor Molly Schnell on Friday, April 16 at 12:00 PM CT while she discusses her paper, "The lasting impacts of school shootings."
April 15, 20212:00 PM - 3:00 PMSeminar in Industrial OrganizationMatt O'Keefe (Northwestern University): Title TBA
April 15, 202112:15 PM - 1:15 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarRiccardo Bianchi Vimercati (Northwestern University): Title TBA
April 14, 20214:00 PM - 5:30 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryElena Esposito (University of Lausanne): "Reconciliation Narratives: The Birth of a Nation after the US Civil War" *All spring seminars will take place via Zoom
April 14, 202111:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarJose Alvarado (Northwestern University): "The Dynamics of Tax Progressivity: A Macro-Political Economy Approach"
April 13, 20213:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in EconometricsEric Auerbach (Northwestern University): "The Local Approach to Network Interference" (Joint with Max Tabord-Meehan) *All spring seminars will take place via Zoom
April 12, 202112:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsMatt Rognlie (Northwestern University): "Exchange Rates and Monetary Policy with Heterogeneous Agents: Sizing up the Real Income Channel" (Joint with Adrien Auclert, Martin Souchier, and Ludwig Straub) *All spring seminars will take place via Zoom
April 12, 202111:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student Seminar Laura Murphy (Northwestern University): 
April 9, 202112:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Sebastian Ottinger (UCLA) - ‘’History’s Masters: The Effect of European Monarchs on State Performance”
April 8, 20214:00 PM - 5:30 PMSeminar in Applied MicroeconomicsErica Field (Duke University): "Title TBA"  *All spring seminars will take place via Zoom
April 8, 20212:00 PM - 3:00 PMSeminar in Industrial OrganizationMiguel Talamas (Northwestern University): “David vs Goliath: Mexican Corner Stores Facing Convenience Chains”
April 7, 20211:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development Lunch Ricardo Dahis (Northwestern University): "The Impact of 3G Mobile Internet on Educational Outcomes in Brazil" (with Pedro Bessone and Lisa Ho).  Abstract:Does the availability of mobile broadband internet affect children's test scores? We compare Portuguese and math scores before and after the staggered entry of 3G into Brazil's 5,570 municipalities using an event study design. Despite the evidence that 3G is widely adopted and used by Brazilians, we find that there is no effect of mobile internet on Portuguese or math scores, and can reject effect sizes of 0.02 standard deviations for 5th grade students, and 0.01 standard deviations for 9th grade students. Taken together, our results indicate that simply offering high-speed mobile internet is not sufficient to improve educational outcomes.      
April 7, 202111:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarJingyuan Wang (Northwestern University): "Subsidy, Market Structure Change, and Innovationdynamics in the Chinese Electric Vehicle industry"
April 5, 202112:00 PM - 1:00 PMIPR Colloquium: S. Jayachandran (IPR/Econ) - Designing Survey Modules by Combining Qualitative Interview Data and Machine Learning"Designing Survey Modules by Combining Qualitative Interview Data and Machine Learning"* by Seema Jayachandran, Professor of Economics and IPR Fellow This event is part of the Spring 2021 Fay Lomax Cook IPR Colloquium Series. * Designates that the presentation will involve work in progress.
April 5, 202112:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsMariacristina De Nardi (University of Minnesota): "Are Marriage-Related Taxes and Social Security Benefits Holding Back Female Labor Supply?" *All spring seminars will take place via Zoom
April 5, 202111:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarFransisco Pareschi (Northwestern University): Environmental regulation underuncertainty: The case of Australia’s watermarket.
April 1, 20212:00 PM - 3:00 PMSeminar in Industrial OrganizationTing Wang (Northwestern University): "Title TBD" (30 minutes)
April 1, 202112:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar CANCELED
March 31, 20211:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development Lunch Sean Higgins (Northwestern University): "Price Comparison Tools in Consumer Credit Markets" Abstract: Consumer credit markets feature large amounts of price dispersion, and the same consumer can be offered substantially different interest rates by different banks. Nevertheless, consumers do not search much across banks: in Chile, only 3% of consumers searched at another bank after receiving a loan offer. One reason consumers may not search is that they have inaccurate expectations about price dispersion or the benefits of search. Using administrative data on the universe of consumer loans from Chile's financial regulator, we built an interactive loan price comparison tool. The tool provides just-in-time, personalized information by showing a consumer the distribution of interest rates that similar consumers received for similar loans in the past six months. We will conduct a randomized controlled trial (RCT) among Chilean consumers who are searching for a loan to measure the impact of the loan price comparison tool on priors about prices and price dispersion, planned and actual search behavior, and eventual loan terms.    
March 31, 202112:00 PM - 1:00 PMEconomics Junior Recruitment SeminarAparna Anand- City University of New York Graduate Center
March 31, 202111:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarYoshimasa Katayama (Northwestern University): "Facilitating Positive Assortative Matching through Quality Information Disclosure in Healthcare Markets"
March 30, 202111:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarAhnaf Rafi (Northwestern University): "Semiparametric Efficiency Under Covariate Adaptive Randomization"
March 26, 202112:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Sng Tuan Hwee (Northwestern University): Title TBA    
March 26, 202112:00 PM - 1:00 PMEconomics Junior Recruitment SeminarSidonia McKenzie- Kansas State University
March 25, 202112:00 PM - 1:00 PMEconomics Junior Recruitment SeminarChristopher Dobronyi- University of Toronto
March 19, 202112:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Leander Heldring (Northwestern) : “Bureaucracy as a tool for politicians: Evidence from Weimar and Nazi Germany”    
March 18, 202112:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Federico Puglisi (Northwestern University): Title TBA
March 18, 202112:00 PM - 1:00 PMEconomics Junior Recruitment SeminarMichael Gmeiner- Northwestern University
March 17, 20211:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development Lunch Ameet Morjaria  (Northwestern University): "Acquisitions, Management and Efficiency: Evidence from Rwanda's Coffee Industry" (joint work with Rocco Macchiavello) Abstract: Markets in low-income countries often display long tails of inefficient firms and significant misallocation. This paper studies Rwandan coffee mills, an industry initially characterized by widespread inefficiencies that has recently seen a process of consolidation in which exporters have acquired control of a significant number of mills giving rise to multi-plant groups. We combine administrative data with original surveys of both mills and acquirers to understand the consequences of this consolidation. Difference-in-difference results suggest that, controlling for mill and year fixed effects, a mill acquired by a foreign group, but not by a domestic group, improves both productivity and product quality. The difference in performance is not accompanied by changes in mill technology or differential access to capital. Upon acquisition, both foreign and domestic group change mills' managers. Foreign groups, however, recruit younger, more educated and higher ability managers, pay these managers a higher salary (even conditional on manager and mill characteristics) and grant them more autonomy. These “better” managers explain about half of the better performance associated with foreign ownership. The difference in performance reflects superior implementation, rather than management knowledge: following an acquisition, managers in domestic and foreign groups try to implement the same management changes but managers in domestic groups report significantly higher resistance from both workers and farmers and fail to implement the changes. The results have implications for our understanding of organizational change and for fostering market development in emerging markets.
March 15, 202112:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsLuca Fornaro (Centre de Recerca en Economia Internacional): "The Global Financial Resource Curse" *All winter seminars will take place via Zoom
March 11, 202112:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Diego Huerta (Northwestern University): "Wealth Inequality and the Political Economy of Financial and Labour Regulations" (joint with Ronald Fischer)
March 10, 20214:00 PM - 5:30 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryCormac O’Grada (University College Dublin): "Tracking the Famine Irish in New York and Beyond: The Pitfalls and Potential of Automated Census Linkage" *All winter seminars will take place via Zoom
March 10, 20211:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development Lunch Joris Mueller (Northwestern University): "China's Outward Foreign Aid and Domestic Strategic Motives" Abstract: This paper tests whether China uses outward foreign aid to pursue domestic policy goals. First, I show that aid projects are allocated to firms that internalize the government's goal of stabilizing domestic employment in prefectures experiencing labor unrest. I then show that local unrest in China also influences which countries receive foreign aid and when. Finally, I exploit this variation to construct an instrumental variable for foreign aid and find positive short-term effects on recipient country GDP and consumption.
March 8, 202112:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsMorten Ravn (University College London): "Financial Frictions: Macro Vs Micro Volatility" *All winter seminars will take place via Zoom
March 5, 202112:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Megumi Murakami (Northwestern University): Title TBA    
March 4, 20215:00 PM - 6:00 PMGPRL Coffee Chat with Prof. Seema JayachandranProfessor Seema Jayachandran will present her research, “Missing women”: Causes and consequences of gender ratios in developing countries. This event is co-sponsored by Circle of Women and the Economics Department. For the Zoom link, please RSVP to Shloka Shetty (shlokashetty2021@u.northwestern.edu).
March 4, 202112:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarJoao Guerreiro (Northwestern University): Title TBA
March 3, 20214:00 PM - 5:30 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryKatya Zhuravskaya (Paris School of Economics): "Diffusion of Gender Norms: Evidence from Stalin’s Ethnic Deportations" *All winter seminars will take place via Zoom
March 3, 20211:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development Lunch Matteo Magnaricotte  (Northwestern University): presenting "Local Specialization and Growth: The Italian Land Reform" (joint work with Riccardo Bianchi-Vimercati and Giampaolo Lecce) Abstract: This paper analyzes a large-scale redistribution policy and its short- and long-term effects on industrial structure and economic development. We focus on a major land reform implemented by the Italian government in the 1950s. We assemble a novel dataset on the expropriations at the municipal level and on pre- and post-reform socio-economic characteristics. A difference in difference model provides evidence that areas with higher incidence of expropriations reported more employed workers in the agricultural sector (and less in the manufacturing one) in the aftermath of the reform. This result persists over the decades. Finally, we analyze the long-term impact of the reform and, using a matching estimator, we provide evidence of a negative effects on economic growth in the long run: municipalities exposed to the land redistribution are associated with significantly lower income growth in the period 1970-2000. 
March 1, 202112:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsCecile Gaubert (University of California, Berkeley): “Place Based Redistribution“ (Joint with Pat Kline and Danny Yagan) *All winter seminars will take place via Zoom
February 25, 202112:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarJose Alvarado (Northwestern University): Title TBA
February 24, 20214:00 PM - 5:30 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryBelinda Archibong (Columbia University): "Prison Labor: The Price of Prisons and the Lasting Effects of Incarceration" *All winter seminars will take place via Zoom
February 24, 20211:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development LunchJacopo Ponticelli (Northwestern University): The Effects of Climate Change on Labor and Capital Reallocation: Evidence from Brazil (with Paula Bustos and Christoph Albert) Abstract: We study the effect of climate change on the reallocation of labor and capital across regions and sectors. First, we estimate the effect of extreme weather events occurred in Brazil in the last two decades on the local economy of the affected areas. Second, we assess the magnitude and direction of labor and capital flows that they generate. Finally, we study their impact on destination regions.
February 22, 202112:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsRicardo Reis (London School of Economics): "Jumpstarting an International Currency" *All winter seminars will take place via Zoom
February 18, 202112:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarTony Hu (Northwestern University): Title TBA
February 17, 20214:00 PM - 5:30 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryGuo Xu (University of California, Berkeley): "Title TBA" *All winter seminars will take place via Zoom
February 17, 20211:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development LunchMiguel Talamás Marcos (Northwestern University): "David vs Goliath: Mexican Corner Stores Facing Convenience Chains"  Abstract: This paper studies how one of the most prevalent forms of microenterprises, the corner store, responds to increasing competition of large convenience chains. To address the endogenous entry problem, this paper leverages time and market fixed effects with an instrumental variable based on a cost shifter for convenience chains - regional economies of scale - and suitability for convenience chains measured by street width. Convenience chains lead to a reduction in the number of corner stores. This effect is not driven by an increase in exits of corner stores, but by deterring their entry. The managerial advantages of the corner stores being owner-operated allows them to remain productive and keep their core customers.
February 15, 202112:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsBenjamin Moll (London School of Economics): "Present Bias Amplifies the Household Balance-Sheet Channels of Macroeconomic Policy" (Joint with David Laibson and Peter Maxted) *All winter seminars will take place via Zoom
February 12, 202112:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Brendon Andrews (Northwestern University): Reputation in Markets for Physician Services: Historical Evidence from a Shocking Report    
February 11, 202112:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Kristina Manysheva (Northwestern University): Title TBA
February 10, 20214:00 PM - 5:30 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryNiko Wolf (Humboldt University Berlin): "Testing Marx. Income Inequality, Concentration, and Socialism in late 19th century Germany" (with Charlotte Bartels and Felix Kersting) *All winter seminars will take place via Zoom
February 10, 20211:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development LunchKieu-Trang Nguyen (Northwestern University): "Astrology and Matrimony: The Real Effects of Religious Beliefs about Marriage in Vietnam" (joint work with Edoardo Ciscato and Quoc-Anh Do) Abstract: This paper investigates the real consequences of a system of unscientific, illogical religious beliefs in Vietnam. They prescribe that the matching of husband and wife can be auspicious or inauspicious depending on the pair of their birth years. First, we estimate a structural model of assortative marriage matching market, and show that such beliefs in marriage fortune matter to people’s marriage matching, as much as 15% of how much the age and education profile matters. Second, based on this model, we derive a control function for selection into marriage to estimate the effect of auspicious matches on household outcomes, free of the selection bias. We find that auspicious matches increase household expenditure and income by about 3%, and reduces school dropouts without changing the number and composition of children. The likely mechanism operates on relatives’ transfers in case of a negative shock: auspicious couples receive much more transfer when, say, the family suffers from a health shock. Third, we discuss how such testable, unscientific beliefs can persist when their refutation depends on actions 2-3 steps off the equilibrium path.
February 9, 202112:00 PM - 1:00 PM "On the Use of Outcome Tests for Detecting Bias in Decision Making" with Ivan CanayJoin the Department of Economics and Professor Ivan Canay on Tuesday, February 9 at 12:00 PM CST as he discusses his new paper, "On the Use of Outcome Tests for Detecting Bias in Decision Making".
February 8, 202112:00 PM - 1:30 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsFederica Romei (University of Oxford): "Why Does Capital Flow from Equal to Unequal Countries?" *All winter seminars will take place via Zoom
February 5, 202112:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Leander Heldring and Mario Cannella (Northwestern University): “Wealth inequality and social mobility in industrializing England"    
February 4, 202112:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Xiaojie Liu (Northwestern University): “Growth with Two Technologies”. 
February 3, 20214:00 PM - 5:30 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryPauline Grosjean (The University of New South Wales): "Heroes and Villains: The Effects of Combat Heroism on Autocratic Values and Nazi Collaboration in France" (Joint with Julia Cage, Anna Dagorret and Saumitra Jha) *All winter seminars will take place via Zoom
February 3, 20211:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development LunchAlexey Makarin (Northwestern University): "Production Networks and War" (joint with Vasily Korovkin) Abstract: How do severe shocks, such as war, alter the economy? We study how a country's production network is affected by a devastating but localized conflict. We use novel transaction-level data on Ukrainian railway shipments, complemented by administrative data on firms, to document the effect of war on firms and interfirm trade. First, we document substantial propagation effects-trade declines even between firms outside the conflict areas if one of them had traded with the conflict areas before the war. Our estimates suggest that the magnitude of the second-degree effect of conflict is one-third of the first-degree effect. Second, we study firm-level consequences of a change in production network structure. Firms that, for exogenous reasons, become more central in the production network after the start of the conflict receive a lasting boost to their revenues and a temporary one to their profits. A temporary increase in markups suggests a rise in market power as one of the mechanisms. Finally, in a production networks model, we separate the effects of exogenous firm removal and subsequent endogenous network adjustment on firm revenue distribution. At the median of the distribution, network adjustment compensates for 72% of network destruction.
January 29, 202112:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Pawel Janas (Northwestern University): Title TBA    
January 28, 20213:30 PM - 5:00 PMEconomics Junior Recruitment SeminarEmily Ann Cuddy- Princeton University
January 28, 202112:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Cassiano Alves (Northwestern University): Title TBA
January 27, 20211:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development LunchSeema Jayachandran (Northwestern University): "A five-question women's agency index created using machine learning and qualitative interviews" (with M. Biradavolu and J. Cooper) Abstract: We develop a new short survey module for measuring women's agency by combining mixed-methods data collection and machine learning. We select the best five survey questions for the module based on how strongly correlated they are with a "gold standard" measure of women's agency. For a sample of 209 women in Haryana, India, we measure agency, first, through a semi-structured in-depth interview and, second, through a large set of close-ended questions.  We use qualitative coding methods to score each woman's agency based on the interview, which we treat as her true agency. To identify the subset of close-ended questions most predictive of the "truth", we apply statistical methods similar to standard machine learning except that we specify how many survey questions are selected. The resulting 5-question index is as strongly correlated with the coded qualitative interview as is an index that uses all of the candidate questions. We also considered a second gold standard measure of agency, a real-stakes choice between money for oneself or one's husband. This lab game, however, does not measure agency cleanly in our setting. Thus, our preferred survey measure of agency is the one validated against qualitative interviews.  
January 26, 202111:30 AM - 1:00 PMEconomics Junior Recruitment SeminarSilvia Vannutelli- Boston University
January 25, 20213:30 PM - 5:00 PMEconomics Junior Recruitment SeminarElisa Jacome- Princeton University
January 21, 20213:30 PM - 5:00 PMEconomics Junior Recruitment SeminarChristopher Campos- University of California, Berkeley
January 20, 20211:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development Lunch Erika Deserranno (Northwestern University): "Meritocratic Promotions and Worker Productivity: An Experiment in the Public Sector" (joint work with Gianmarco Leon and Philipp Kastrau)   Abstract: We study the effect of making the promotion criteria in an organization more performance-based (i.e., more meritocratic), the effect of increasing the prize associated with a promotion (i.e., more pay progression), and the interplay of the two on worker productivity. In collaboration with a large public sector organization in Sierra Leone, we introduce exogenous variation at the team level in the extent to which the promotion decision from a Community Health Worker (lower-tier) position to a Peer Supervisor (upper-tier) position is based on worker performance (rather than on personal connections). We cross-randomize this with variation in the perceived pay progression between these two positions. We find that more meritocracy in the promotion system increases worker productivity, especially for workers who perceive the pay progression to be large and for those who are highly-ranked in terms of performance. Higher pay progression has opposite effects depending on meritocracy. In meritocratic promotion regimes, a steeper pay progression motivates lower-tier workers to “climb the organization’s ladder” and prompts an increase in their effort. In non-meritocratic promotion regimes, a steeper pay progression instead demotivates workers, lowering their productivity. The combination of steep pay progression and low meritocracy that is the norm in many bureaucracies in developing countries and in multiple private sector firms around the world may thus hinder the productivity of lower-tier workers.
January 19, 20213:30 PM - 5:00 PMEconomics Junior Recruitment SeminarCarolyn Stein- Massachusetts Institute of Technology
January 15, 202111:30 AM - 1:00 PMEconomics Junior Recruitment SeminarNina Roussille- University of California, Berkeley
January 13, 20211:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development Lunch Ashley Wong (Northwestern University) "Business Collaborations and Female Entrepreneurship"(joint work with Edward Asiedu, Francesca Truffa, and Monica Lambon-Quayefio)
January 12, 20213:30 PM - 5:00 PMEconomics Junior Recruitment SeminarZachary Bleemer- University of California, Berkeley
December 10, 202012:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Brittany Almquist Lewis  (Northwestern University): "Housing Inequities"   *all fall lunches will take place via zoom  
December 3, 20204:00 PM - 5:30 PMSeminar in Applied MicroeconomicsMichael Callen (London School of Economics): "Title TBA"  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
December 3, 202012:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Clement Bohr (Northwestern University): Title TBA   *all fall lunches will take place via zoom  
December 2, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development Lunch Kensuke Maeba (Northwestern University): Title TBA   *All fall lunches will take place via zoom
November 30, 202012:15 PM - 1:45 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsMark Gertler (New York University): "Title TBA" (Start time: 12:20 PM)  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
November 27, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Sng Tuan Hwee (National University of Singapore): TBA   *All fall lunches will take place via zoom
November 24, 20204:00 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in EconometricsStephane Bonhomme (University of Chicago): "Teams: Heterogeneity, Sorting and Complementarity" *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
November 23, 202012:15 PM - 1:45 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsEduardo Davila (Yale University): "Prudential Policy with Distorted Beliefs" (Start time: 12:20 PM) *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
November 23, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarMarie Decamps (Northwestern University): "Information Disclosure and Practising Styles: Evidence from Deliveries in Brazil" (start time is 11:10am)  
November 20, 20202:15 PM - 3:15 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarEvgeni Rachkovski (Northwestern University): "Trading Away Democracy: How Does Trading with Autocrats Affect Democratic Values in the Home Country?" (seminar time is 2:20pm to 3:10pm)  
November 20, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Michael Porcellachia (Northwestern University): "Labor Power and Racial Discrimination"   *All fall lunches will take place via zoom
November 19, 20207:00 PM - 8:00 PMAn Evening with Professor KarlanJoin GRC as we speak with Dean Karlan, a professor of Finance at the Kellogg School of Management. Professor Karlan has also founded and led several social impact organizations. The first half of the session will be a deep-dive into Professor Karlan's work at Global Poverty Research Lab and ImpactMatters. The second half will consist of a Q&A for you to ask any specific questions you may have. Please join us on Nov 19 at 7pm CST and email northwestern@grcglobalgroup.com with any questions!      
November 19, 202012:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar  Joao Guerreiro (Northwestern University):  Title TBA   *all fall lunches will take place via zoom  
November 18, 20204:00 PM - 5:30 PMSeminar in Economic HistorySuresh Naidu (Columbia University): "Mobility for All: Representative Intergenerational Mobility Estimates over the 20th Century" (Joint with Elisa Jacome and Ilyana Kuziemko) *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
November 18, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development Lunch Joris Mueller (Northwestern University): Title TBA   *All fall lunches will take place via zoom
November 18, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarYoshimasa Katayama (Northwestern University): "How do Hospitals Respond to Non-Linear Pricing? Evidence from Hospital Payment Reform in Japan" (start time is 11:10am)
November 17, 20204:00 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in EconometricsIvan Canay (Northwestern University): "On the Use of Outcome Tests for Detecting Bias in Decision Making"  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
November 17, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMGame Theory and Decision-Making: "Ruth, Anthony and Clarence." with Jeff ElyJoin us on Tuesday, November 17 at 12:00 PM CT via Zoom Webinar for a talk with Jeff Ely where he will be discussing game theory and decision-making through the lens of the Supreme Court.
November 16, 202012:15 PM - 1:45 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsMichael Woodford (Columbia University): "Optimally Imprecise Memory and Biased Forecasts" (Start time: 12:20 PM)  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
November 16, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student Seminar Ting Wang (Northwestern University): "Parallel Inverse Aggregate Demand Curves in Discrete Choice Models" (start time is 11:10am)
November 13, 20202:15 PM - 3:15 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarJason Premo (Northwestern University): "Title TBA" (seminar time is 2:20pm to 3:10pm)
November 13, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Mario Cannella (Northwestern University): “The Legacy of Nazi Annexation”   *All fall lunches will take place via zoom
November 12, 202012:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Riccardo Bianchi-Vimercati (Northwestern University):  Title TBA   *all fall lunches will take place via zoom  
November 11, 20204:00 PM - 5:30 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryDaniel Gross (Harvard Business School): "Automation and the Fate of Young Workers: Evidence from Telephone Operation in the Early 20th Century" *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
November 11, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development Lunch Ritwika Sen and Hossein Alidaee (Northwestern University):  First Presenter: Ritwika Sen Title: Covid19 and the Value of Relationships in Informal Economies (with Vittorio Bassi, Tommaso Porzio and Esau Tugume) Abstract: This project focuses on the value of employment relationships in informal economies, where there are usually no written labor or trade contracts. By studying the resilience of these relationships to the Covid19 lockdown, we seek to understand whether these relationships are valuable, and to clarify the sources of their value. We argue that in periods of normalcy inefficient firm-worker matches may persist in the presence of labor market frictions. However, these relationships will be disrupted if they hold little value and there is a cost to re-match (e.g. workers traveling back to the city) as managers will hire different workers once firms reopen after the lockdown. If instead relationships are valuable, these will restart despite any costs to re-match even in the absence of formal contracts. Our starting point is a representative survey of about 1,000 managers and their employees that we conducted in 2018-19. We are now re-surveying this sample through a phone survey to understand which relationships have been disrupted and why. To further examine the sources of relationship value we introduce a nudging experiment and plan to interpret our findings using an adaptation of the canonical Diamond-Mortensen-Pissarides (DMP) model of search and matching. Second Presenter: Hossein Alidaee Title: “Recovering Network Structure from Aggregated Relational Data using Penalized Regression”, joint w. E. Auerbach and M. Leung Abstract: Social network data can be expensive to collect. Breza (2020) propose aggregated relational data (ARD) as a low-cost substitute that can be used to recover the structure of a latent social network when it is generated by a specific parametric random effects model. Our main observation is that many economic network formation models produce networks that are effectively low-rank. As a consequence, network recovery from ARD is generally possible without parametric assumptions using a nuclear-norm penalized regression. We demonstrate how to implement this method and provide finite-sample bounds on the mean squared error of the resulting estimator for the distribution of network links. Computation takes seconds for samples with hundreds of observations. Easy-to-use code in R and Python can be found at https://github.com/mpleung/ARD. *All fall lunches will take place via zoom
November 11, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarAnran Li (Northwestern University): "Design of the Public Option in the ACA Individual Insurance Market " (start time is 11:10am)
November 10, 20204:00 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in EconometricsMatthew Thirkettle (Cornell University): "Identification and Estimation of Network Statistics with Missing Link Data"  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
November 9, 202012:15 PM - 1:45 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsCharles Engel (University of Wisconsin-Madison): "Banks, Dollar Liquidity and Exchange Rates"(Start time: 12:20 PM)  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
November 9, 202012:00 PM - 1:15 PMIPR 2020 Post-Election PanelIPR 2020 Post-Election Panel Panelists: Martin Eichenbaum, Charles Moskos Professor Professor of Economics Laurel Harbridge-Yong, Associate Professor of Political Science and IPR Fellow Erik Nisbet, Owen L. Coon Endowed Professor of Policy Analysis & Communication and IPR Associate Chloe Thurston, Assistant Professor of Political Science and IPR Fellow Moderator: Daniel Galvin, Associate Professor of Political Science and IPR Fellow Organized by James Druckman, Payson S. Wild Professor of Political Science and IPR Associate Director and Fellow This event is part of the 2020 Fay Lomax Cook IPR Colloquium Series.
November 9, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarMauren Vairo (Northwestern University): "Screening with a Privately Informed Seller and Market Learning" (start time is 11:10am)
November 6, 20202:15 PM - 3:15 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarGaston Lopez (Northwestern University): "Competition, Coordination and Technology adoption: Evidence from the hospital industry" (seminar time is 2:20pm to 3:10pm)
November 6, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Klas Eriksson (Stockholm University): "Who owns the city?- General and Specific Regulation of Public and Private Interests in Stockholm Real Estate Market 1959-2020"
November 5, 202012:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Emre Yavuz (Northwestern University):  Title TBA   *all fall lunches will take place via zoom  
November 4, 20204:00 PM - 5:30 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryMichele Rosenberg (Northwestern University): "Tell Me What You Grow and I’ll Tell You What You Think: Westward Expansion and the Politics of Slavery in the US South"  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
November 4, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarJingyuan Wang (Northwestern University): "Title TBA" (start time is 11:10am)
November 3, 20204:00 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in EconometricsDalia Ghanem (University of California, Davis): "Testing Attrition Bias in Field Experiments"  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
November 2, 202012:15 PM - 1:45 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsIan Dew-Becker & Alireza Tahbaz-Salehi (Northwestern University): "Systemic Risk in Production Networks" (Start time: 12:20 PM)  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
November 2, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarEdmund Yiqi Lou (Northwestern University): "Pandemics, social distancing, and political narrative" (start time is 11:10am)
October 30, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Andy Ferrara (University of Pittsburgh): "Group Cohesion Under Stress: An Event-Study Analysis of Desertions in the Civil War"   *All fall lunches will take place via zoom
October 29, 202012:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Santiago Camara (Northwestern University):  Title TBA   *all fall lunches will take place via zoom    
October 28, 20203:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryWalker Hanlon (New York University): "The Rise of the Engineer: Inventing the Professional Inventor During the Industrial Revolution" *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
October 28, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development Lunch Matteo Magnaricotte (Northwestern University): "College Entry, Educational Spillovers, and Market Structure in Perú”, joint with J. Flor-Toro Abstract: As they complete the compulsory component of their schooling, students have to weigh the benefits from further education against its cost. The availability of college education can decrease the probability of dropout by increasing the ex-ante returns to a high school diploma. Analyzing the fast-growing higher education market of Peru, we provide preliminary evidence regarding the spillovers of colleges on secondary schooling, identifying an increase in high school graduation rates of similar size to the increase in students attending university. We observe that this spillover effect is present for public colleges but not for private ones. We further discuss how the sequentiality of educational choices and spillover effects of public colleges can affect market structure and private entry.   *All fall lunches will take place via zoom
October 28, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarLaura Murphy (Northwestern University): "A Behavioural Aiyagari Model" (start time is 11:10am)
October 27, 20204:00 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in EconometricsIsaac Loh (Northwestern University): "Nonparametric Identification and Estimation with Discrete Instruments" *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
October 26, 202012:15 PM - 1:45 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsAndrei Levchenko (University of Michigan): "International Comovement in the Global Production Network" (Start time: 12:20 PM) *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
October 26, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarFrancisco Pareschi (Northwestern University): "Oligopolistic Pricing Under Inflation: Evidence from the Soft Drink Industry in Uruguay" (start time is 11:10am)
October 23, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch SeminarKelly Strada (Northwestern University): "Role Mothers: Intergenerational Transmission of Attitudes towards Work" Abstract: Do women pay a social cost for working? Are children of working women disadvantaged or empowered? In this project, I exploit the WWII draft lottery to attain individual-level variation in the labor supply decisions for the wives of draft-eligible men. Specifically, I construct a novel wartime measure of labor force entry—SSN first issuance—and combine it with data on army enlistment and war supply contracts. By exploiting within-labor market variation in the demand for female work over time and the timing of one’s husband conscription, I can assess the ex-ante ambiguous long-term consequences of being (a child of) a working woman, as measured in restricted-access longitudinal censuses and surveys.   *All fall lunches will take place via zoom
October 22, 20204:00 PM - 5:30 PMSeminar in Applied MicroeconomicsJoe Long (Northwestern University): "Chinese Capital Flight to the US Real Estate Market"  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
October 22, 202012:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Carl Hallmann (Northwestern University): Title TBA   *all fall lunches will take place via zoom  
October 21, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development Lunch Eduardo Campillo Betancourt (Northwestern University): "Citizenship Policy and the Spread of Communicable Diseases: Evidence from the Dominican Republic" joint with F. Alba-Vivar and J. Flor-Toro Abstract: We study two controversial policies in the Dominican Republic in 2013 and 2015 that targeted as much as 10% of the country's population based on their foreign ancestry and limited their safe access to services such as health. Beyond the direct negative effects such policies may have on the targeted group, we argue that there may be important indirect effects from such policies through the contagion of communicable diseases. We exploit the timing and differential exposure to these policies across the country, as well as highly disaggregated epidemiological data on diseases to provide evidence of these indirect effects. Our estimates provide evidence of a notable increase in the caseload of Dengue, a highly contagious disease. Contrarily, there are no effects either for communicable diseases that are less contagious, or for non-communicable diseases. We argue that these results are due to a restriction in access to health services.   *All fall lunches will take place via zoom
October 21, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarMatthew O'Keefe (Northwestern University): "Innovation Policy in Software Markets & The 2012 JOBS Act" (start time is 11:10am)
October 20, 20204:00 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in EconometricsLixiong Li (Johns Hopkins University): "Title TBA"  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
October 19, 202012:15 PM - 1:45 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsLaura Veldkamp (Columbia University): "A Growth Model of the Data Economy" (Start time: 12:20 PM)  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
October 19, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarPanagiotis Kyriazis (Northwestern University): "On the Dynamics of Government Interventions in Markets with Adverse Selection" (start time is 11:10am)
October 16, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Amy Coomb (University of Chicago): "Beyond the Nitrogen Thesis:  Brassica Napus Oilseed in the British Agricultural Revolution"   *All fall lunches will take place via zoom
October 15, 20204:00 PM - 5:30 PMSeminar in Applied MicroeconomicsRicardo Dahis (Northwestern University): "Title TBA"  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
October 15, 202012:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Kristina Manysheva (Northwestern University): Title TBA   *all fall lunches will take place via zoom  
October 14, 20204:00 PM - 5:30 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryKatherine Eriksson (University of California, Davis): "Understanding the Success of the Know-Nothing Party"  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
October 14, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development Lunch José Flor Toro (Northwestern University): "Getting health professionals to underserved areas in developing countries: wages, career-incentives, and selection" joint with M. Magnaricotte. Abstract: Human resources in health are unequally distributed within many developing countries, a factor which contributes to unequal access to health. Since job positions in poor and remote areas are often unattractive to health professionals, governments rely on different incentives to draw professionals to underserved areas. Are these incentives efficient in attracting health professionals and are they ultimately effective in improving health outcomes? We study Peru’s civil service requirement in remote areas for recently graduated health professionals, and two major reforms on the schedule of wages and career incentives for this particular system. We exploit discontinuities in the incentives schedules introduced by the reforms to document two facts. First, while both incentives seem to be effective in attracting health professionals scoring higher in major-specific tests, physicians respond strongly to career incentives and nurses to pay increases. Second, despite observably 'better' health professionals, health outcomes did not improve and in some cases worsened. We argue that this may result from the pattern of selection created by reforms in a system with limited job positions, different incentives, and different types of health professionals beyond what is measured in test scores. We then discuss a framework to quantify these selection patterns by exploiting administrative data and the system's centralized allocation.   *All fall lunches will take place via zoom
October 14, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarDiego Cid Ortiz (Northwestern University): "Monetary Policy and Commercial Banks in the Mexican Mortgage Market" (start time is 11:10am)
October 13, 20204:00 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in EconometricsVira Semenova (Harvard University): "Better Lee Bounds"  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
October 12, 202012:15 PM - 1:45 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsAlessandra Peter (Princeton University): "Owning Up: Closely Held Firms and Wealth Inequality" (Start time: 12:20 PM)  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
October 12, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarMatias Bayas-Erazo (Northwestern University): "Financial Market Structure, Asset Prices, and Monetary Policy" (start time is 11:10am)
October 9, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Pawel Janas (Northwestern University): "Public Goods Under Financial Distress: Evidence from Cities in the Great Depression"   *All fall lunches will take place via zoom
October 8, 20204:00 PM - 5:30 PMSeminar in Applied MicroeconomicsUtsav Manjeer (Northwestern University): "Title TBA"  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
October 8, 202012:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Egor Kozlov (Northwestern University): Title TBA   *all fall lunches will take place via zoom  
October 7, 20204:00 PM - 5:30 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryFelipe Valencia Caicedo (Vancouver School of Economics): “Trust Unraveled: The Long Shadow of the Spanish Civil War”  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
October 7, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development Lunch Jimmy Lee (Northwestern University): "Conventional Roles, Beliefs, and the Intergenerational Transmission of Agricultural Innovations: Preliminary Evidence, Theory, and a Field Experiment in Liberia" Abstract: As the youth population and school enrollment continue to rise in sub-Saharan Africa, school programs that provide practical life skills are increasingly common. Such programs can cost-effectively diffuse new knowledge into households. However, students conventionally assist their elders in many household decisions. A reversal of roles is required for students to teach their elders new practices. Unaware of skills that students have learnt in schools, elders are skeptical that students have valuable knowledge. Students, knowing that elders are skeptical, might be reluctant to engage in discussions of what they have learnt. This paper studies these informational barriers to intergenerational transmission of innovations in the context of a school-based agricultural education program in Liberia. I construct a novel game that highlights inefficiencies in communication when (i) an information friction hindering one player’s update on the state of nature is commonly known to both parties; (ii) costs of communication and/or sanctions for violating prevailing norms necessitate coordination between players; and (iii) players form beliefs with reference to conventional roles. I design a field experiment to separately identify biases in the reduced-form beliefs of students and their elders, to test policy-relevant informational treatments, and to measure their effects on the flow of agricultural innovations and production patterns within households.     *All fall lunches will take place via zoom
October 7, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarXiaoyun Qiu (Northwestern University): "Learning and Communication in a Changing World " (start time is 11:10am)
October 6, 20204:00 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in EconometricsKenichi Nagasawa (University of Warwick): "Identification and Estimation of Partial Effects with Proxy Variables"  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
October 5, 202012:15 PM - 1:45 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsDmitry Mukhin (University of Wisconsin-Madison): "Optimal Policy under Dollar Pricing" (joint with Konstantin Egorov) (Start time: 12:20 PM)  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
October 5, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarTomas Wilner (Northwestern University): "The Environmental Benefit of a Price Subsidy" (start time is 11:10am)
October 2, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Marco Tabellini (Harvard Business School): "Racial Diversity, Electoral Preferences, and the Supply of Policy: the Great Migration and Civil Rights."   *All fall lunches will take place via zoom
October 1, 202012:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Bence Bardocy (Northwestern University): Title TBA   *all fall lunches will take place via zoom  
September 30, 20204:00 PM - 5:30 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryMaggie Chen (George Washington University): "Omnia Juncta in Uno: Foreign Powers and Trademark Protection in Shanghai's Concession Era"  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
September 30, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development Lunch Sean Higgins  (Northwestern University): "Increasing Financial Inclusion and Attracting Deposits through Prize-Linked Savings" Abstract: Despite the benefits of saving in formal financial institutions, take-up and use of savings accounts are low among the poor. In a randomized experiment across 110 bank branches throughout Mexico, we provide a temporary incentive to both open and use a savings account: saving earns raffle tickets for cash prizes. We find that 41% more accounts are opened in treatment branches than control branches during the incentive months, and the temporary two-month incentive has a lasting three-year impact on the number of deposits made at treatment branches. Prize-linked savings can thus benefit both poor households and banks.     *All fall lunches will take place via zoom
September 30, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarGuillaume Gex (Northwestern University): "The Impact of Private Data Sharing" (start time is 11:10am)
September 28, 202012:15 PM - 1:45 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsPooya Molavi (Northwestern University): "Simple Factor Models and Macroeconomic Expectations" (Start time: 12:20 PM)  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
September 28, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarAhnaf Rafi (Northwestern University): "Estimating Heterogeneous Responses in Dyadic Regression Using Universal Singular Value Thresholding" (start time is 11:10am)
September 25, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Diego Ramos Toro (Dartmouth College): "Self-Emancipation and Progressive Politics: The Legacy of Civil War Refugee Camps"   *All fall lunches will take place via zoom
September 24, 20204:00 PM - 5:30 PMSeminar in Applied MicroeconomicsMauricio Romero (Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México): "Factorial designs, model selection, and (incorrect) inference in randomized experiments"" *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
September 24, 202012:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Jane Olmstead-Rumsey (Northwestern University): Title TBA   *all fall lunches will take place via zoom  
September 23, 20204:00 PM - 5:30 PMSeminar in Economic HistoryBruno Caprettini (University of Zurich): "From Welfare to Warfare: New Deal Spending and Patriotism during World War II"  *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
September 23, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development Lunch Chao Liu (Northwestern University): "Early-Life Health and Lifetime Outcomes: Evidence from the Large-Scale Schistosomiasis Eradication in China" (joint work with G.G. Liu) Abstract: Schistosomiasis is one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in the world. This paper studies a large-scale deworming program targeted to schistosomiasis in China, to identify the long-term impacts of early-life health on adult outcomes. Using multiple identification strategies, we find that the disease control campaign led to increased educational attainment and adult economic status. The education effect for women was greater than that for men, but the income effect was reversed. Moreover, people in counties with a low initial education level mainly improved in basic education. The results also suggest that the education effect was larger when the intervention happened in utero and for people from a low socioeconomic background. Furthermore, we document the positive impact on employment for people in their fifties, job prestigiousness, adult health, and cognitive abilities. We also find a positive effect on the education level of the treated cohorts’ children.   *All fall lunches will take place via zoom
September 23, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarAlex Doser (Northwestern University): "Labor Market Adjustments in the Great Depression" (start time is 11:10am)
September 21, 202012:15 PM - 1:45 PMSeminar in MacroeconomicsThomas Winberry (University of Chicago Booth School of Business): "The Investment Network, Sectoral Comovement, and the Changing U.S. Business Cycle" (Joint with Christian vom Lehn) (Start time: 12:20 PM) *All fall seminars will take place via Zoom
September 21, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarJose Alvarado (Northwestern University): "Unequal Taxes, Heterogeneous Rate of Returns, and Wealth Inequality" (start time is 11:10am)
September 18, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar John Clegg (University of Chicago): "The Carceral Legacy of Slavery"   *All fall lunches will take place via zoom
September 17, 202012:30 PM - 1:30 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarSpeaker: TBA   *all fall lunches will take place via zoom
September 16, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMEconomics Development Lunch Nancy Qian (Northwestern University):  The Soviet Great Famine, 1932–33 (joint with A. Markevich and N. Naumenko) Abstract: This paper investigates the causes of the Soviet Great Famine, 1932–33, and documents several new empirical facts. First, excess mortality was much higher in regions with a higher share of ethnic Ukrainians, even outside of the Soviet Republic of Ukraine. Second, this cannot be explained by differences in natural conditions, grain productivity, demographic structure or urbanization. Third, in regions with a higher share of ethnic Ukrainians, Soviet economic policies were implemented more zealously, which resulted in higher food procurement and famine mortality. Fourth, there is suggestive evidence that mortality was exacerbated by the presence of non-ethnic Ukrainian Communist Party bureaucrats. These and other results in the paper provide novel evidence for the presence of ethnic bias in famine-era Soviet policies and the contribution of ethnic bias to famine mortality.   *All fall lunches will take place via zoom
September 16, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarFergal Hanks (Northwestern University): "Durable Good Demand and Production" (start time is 11:10am)
September 11, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar - CANCELEDMelanie Meng Xue (NYAD) - Title "TBA"
September 3, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMECON Open House- WCAS Virtual Academic FairJoin the Department of Economics for a virtual information session on the Economics major/minor!
September 2, 20202:00 PM - 3:00 PMECON Open House- WCAS Virtual Academic FairJoin the Department of Economics for a virtual information session on the Economics major/minor!
September 1, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMAcademic Directions Fair: Roads to Business (Panel)Learn about life at Northwestern from current faculty, staff, and students. Northwestern graduates go on to lead successful careers in business and enjoy high acceptance rates to MBA programs. Learn about Northwestern’s approach to undergraduate business education. Learn About: -Chicago Field Studies (Internship Program) -Economics -Farley Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation -Integrated Marketing Communications (IMC) -Kapnick Center for Business Institutions -Kellogg Certificate Program for Undergraduates (CPU) Please fill out this form to RSVP and to receive your link to the event.
August 14, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMTEST Event This is a test - not a real event
August 7, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMFirst Year Facebook Q&A with Mark Witte and Rowan Lapi, ECON '23Join us THIS Friday, August 7 at Noon CST for a Q&A session with Director of Undergraduate Studies and Professor, Mark Witte and  current undergraduate Rowan Lapi, ECON '23 Event will take place via zoom; please contact lola.ittner@u.northwestern.edu to be sent the link.  
August 3, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMVirtual COVID-19 Talk with Matthias Doepke & Martin EichenbaumJoin the Department of Economics on Monday, August 3, 2020, at 12:00 PM CST for a virtual alumni talk with Economics Professors, Matthias Doepke and Martin Eichenbaum, as they discuss their research on the economic impact of COVID-19.
July 10, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch Seminar Emre Yavuz (Northwestern University): “Technology Adoption and Invention: Evidence from the Industrial Revolution in France”
June 26, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch SeminarMichele Rosenberg (NU) - "Holding on to Power: Racial Violence and Labor Relations in a Post Slavery Society" (joint with J. Clegg, F. Masera, and S. Walker)  
June 22, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMVirtual Seminar in MacroeconomicsMichele Tertilt (University of Mannheim): "An economic model of the Covid-19 epidemic: The importance of testing and age-specific policies"
June 18, 20203:00 PM - 4:00 PMDepartment of Economics Virtual Senior Awards CeremonyPlease join us to virtually celebrate our senior award recipients. We will be giving out the Coen, Deibler and Eisner Awards, as well acknowledging the students who received department honors.
June 15, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMVirtual Seminar in MacroeconomicsSimon Mongey (University of Chicago): "Unbundling Labor"
June 12, 20202:00 PM - 3:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarMatthew Thomas (Northwestern University): "Asymmetric All-Pay Contests with Spillovers"
June 12, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch SeminarJoris Mueller (Northwestern University) - "Building National Identity: a Historic(al) Policy Experiment in TanzaniaD"  
June 11, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMMacroeconomics Lunch SeminarAdriana Troian (Northwestern University) -"Title TBD"  
June 10, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarKensuke Maeba (Northwestern University): "Interaction with Local Officials for Effective School Monitoring in India"
June 8, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMVirtual Seminar in MacroeconomicsMatthias Doepke: "This Time It's Different: The Role of Women's Employment in the Great Lockdown" (Titan Alon, Matthias Doepke, Jane Olmstead-Rumsey, and Michèle Tertilt)
June 8, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarClement Bohr (Northwestern University): "Land, Labor, and Inflation"
June 5, 20202:00 PM - 3:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarValentyn Litvin (Northwestern University): "Common Ambiguity"
June 5, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch SeminarQ&A with Sciences Po "Emperors without Scepters: Early Colonial Leaders’ Personality and Civil Conflicts in French Western Africa" A link to the talk will be circulated a few minutes before noon.
June 3, 20203:30 PM - 5:00 PMCANCELLED: Seminar in Economic HistoryDaniel Gross (Harvard Business School): "Automation and the Plight of Young Workers: Evidence from the Automation of Telephone Operation in the Early 20th Century"
June 3, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch Seminar Jose Flor Toro (Northwestern University) - "Title TBD"
June 3, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarJingxiong Hu (Northwestern University): "Leveraged payouts and credit allocation efficiency"
June 1, 20203:30 PM - 5:00 PMSeminar in Industrial OrganizationIgal Hendel (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
June 1, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMCANCELLED: Seminar in MacroeconomicsEduardo Davila (Yale University): "Title TBD"
June 1, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMVirtual Seminar in MacroeconomicsGuido Lorenzoni: "Macroeconomic Implications of COVID-19: Can Negative Supply Shocks Cause Demand Shortages?" 
June 1, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarMaria Fernanda Petri Betto (Northwestern University): "Of schools and shams"
May 29, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomics of History Lunch SeminarPawel Janas (Northerwestern University) - "Economic Effects of the 1918 Pandemic: Evidence from the U.S"
May 28, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Egor Kozlov (Northwestern University) - "Title TBD"  
May 27, 20203:30 PM - 5:00 PMCANCELLED: Seminar in Economic HistoryLeah Boustan (Princeton University): "Title TBD"
May 27, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch SeminarUtsav Manjeer (Northwestern University) - "Let the (P)rice Flow: The Local Economic Effects of India's Agricultural Export Ban" Abstract: Restrictive and uncertain trade regimes are prevalent in developing countries. While trade restrictions are often intended to shield the economy from volatility in global markets, such distortions can have unintended consequences for economic agents across the supply chain in domestic markets. I investigate the local economic effects of India’s wheat and rice export ban during 2007-2011. Using data from almost 2 million transactions, I first show that farmers received lower prices particularly in, but not limited to, areas that the ban is more likely to affect. I then show that there is limited evidence of transmission of the low prices to consumers. Using a novel approach with trade routes, I argue that the export ban worsens domestic market integration. One driving force I find is that farmers restrict supply. I also discuss next steps and other potential mechanisms at play, including the uncertainty surrounding agriculture policy and grain procurement policies of the government.  
May 27, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarDeborah Kim (Northwestern University): "Inference in conditional two-sample problems"
May 25, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMVirtual Seminar in MacroeconomicsLukasz Rachel: "An Analytical Model of Covid-19 Lockdowns" 
May 22, 20202:00 PM - 3:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarMario Cannella (Northwestern University): "The Effects of Forced Annexation: Evidence from Nazi Operational Zones in Italy"
May 22, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch SeminarMatteo Magniaricotte (Northwestern University) - "Local Specialization and Growth: The Italian Land Reform " (joint with Bianchi Vimercati and Giampaolo Lecce) The talk will be held from 12.00 to 1.30 pm (CST) on Zoom.  A link to the talk will be provided a few minutes before noon.  
May 21, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Riccardo Vimercati (Northwestern University) - "Title TBD"  
May 20, 20203:30 PM - 5:00 PMCANCELLED: Seminar in Economic HistoryKatherine Eriksson (University of California, Davis): "Title TBD"
May 20, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch Seminar Matteo Magnaricotte (Northwestern University) - "College Entry and Local Market Outcomes in Perú, joint with José Flor-Toro" Abstract: We study the effects of entry of universities on local outcomes in the context of Peru. Especially in developing countries, the opening of a university is seen as a harbinger of economic prosperity. However, proper identification of such effects poses notable challenges, and reliable empirical evidence remains scant. Thanks to favorable institutional characteristics of the political and higher education context in Peru, we propose an identification strategy new to the literature addressing the research question, and present preliminary results.
May 20, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarNicole Ozminkowski (Northwestern University): "Rent Control and Domestic Violence"
May 19, 20204:00 PM - 5:00 PMThe Undergraduate Economics Society Presents: The Global Impacts of COVID-19 with Martin Eichenbaum & Matthias DoepkeJoin Economics Professors Martin Eichenbaum and Matthias Doepke as they discuss the global economic implication of COVID-19. 
May 19, 20203:30 PM - 5:00 PMCANCELLED: Seminar in EconometricsMichal Kolesar (Princeton University): "Title TBD"
May 18, 20203:30 PM - 5:00 PMCANCELLED: Seminar in Industrial OrganizationBob Town (The University of Texas at Austin): "Title TBD"
May 18, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMCANCELLED: Seminar in MacroeconomicsMark Gertler (New York University): "Title TBD"
May 18, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarYong Cai (Northwestern University): "A Permutation Test for the Level of Clustering"
May 15, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch SeminarLukas Rosenberger (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München) - "Knowledge, Education, and Economic Growth: Evidence from the Enlightenment in France"  
May 14, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Bence Bardoczy (Northwestern University) - "Title TBD"  
May 13, 20203:30 PM - 5:00 PMCANCELLED: Seminar in Economic HistoryRowena Gray (University of California, Merced): "Title TBD"
May 13, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch Seminar Silvia Vanutelli (Boston University) - "Monitoring and Local Governance: Evidence from Italy" Abstract: Monitoring by external auditors is a ubiquitous practice in complex organizations. Frequently, the audited entity appoints the external auditor. While locally-appointed auditors might have better local knowledge, leaving discretion in the hands of the audited party might impair monitoring quality. In this paper, I exploit a unique setting which allows me to evaluate this trade-off in the context of auditing of municipal budgets of local governments. In 2011, Italy introduced a reform that removed the discretion of the appointment of municipal auditors from mayors and introduced a random-assignment system. The objective of the reform was to strengthen monitoring and ensure fiscal sustainability of municipal budgets. I study the consequences of increased monitoring on public finance outcomes of local governments. My identification exploits the staggered introduction of the reform across municipalities in an event-study setting. I obtain three main findings. First, the reform greatly increased compliance with fiscal rules: treated municipalities increase their surpluses by 20% and their debt repayments by 2%. Second, improvements largely come from municipalities in which the mayor had control of the appointment of the previous auditor and from those local governments that were running deficits before the reform. Third, the improvement in compliance with fiscal rules comes at a cost: treated municipalities significantly cut investment expenditures by over 7% and increase local taxes by 8%. 
May 13, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarJose Flor Toro (Northwestern University): "The Welfare Impacts of the Allocation of Human Capital: Evidence from Peru’s Centralized Allocation of Health Professionals"
May 12, 20203:30 PM - 5:00 PMCANCELLED: Seminar in EconometricsLixiong Li (Johns Hopkins University): "Title TBD"
May 11, 20203:30 PM - 5:00 PMCANCELLED: Seminar in Industrial OrganizationLouis Kaplow (Harvard University): "Competition Policy in a Simple General Equilibrium Model"
May 11, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMCANCELLED- Seminar in MacroeconomicsMichael Woodford (Columbia University): "Title TBD"
May 11, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarMegumi Murakami (Northwestern University): "Coevolution of Culture and Institution"
May 8, 20202:00 PM - 3:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarCarl Hallman (Northwestern University): "Payment Shocks"
May 8, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch SeminarRiccardo Marchingiglio (Northwestern University) - "The Economics of Gender-Specific Minimum-Wage Legislation" Abstract: During the 1910's, twelve states passed and implemented the first minimum-wage laws in the history of the United States. These laws covered specific industries and only applied to female employees. We study the employment impact of these gender-specific minimum-wage laws, using full count Census data from 1880 to 1940. First, applying a triple-difference strategy exploiting variation across states, industries, and time to both the full sample of U.S. counties and the restricted group of contiguous county pairs, we estimate separate models for men and women, and we find that these laws led to a decrease in female employment and an increase in the employment of adult men. Second, guided by a simple labor demand setting, we estimate the average elasticity of substitution between male and female labor, and show that the two inputs were, on average, gross substitutes. Third, using a newly constructed longitudinal sample of linked Census records of women, we show that (1) married women were more likely to exit the labor force as a result of the decline in demand; (2) unmarried women switched to untreated industries; (3) the decline in labor demand did not induce significant migration patterns. Finally, we provide suggestive evidence of a long-run impact of gender-specific minimum-wage laws on female labor force participation, after the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938.
May 7, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Kristina Manysheva - "Title TBD"  
May 6, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch Seminar Joris Mueller (Northwestern University) - "China’s Development Assistance and the Role of its Firms " Abstract: Many countries provide foreign aid to facilitate economic stability and development in poor countries. I posit that donors may also use development assistance to other countries to stabilize demand within their own economies. I study the context of China, which provides much of its official development assistance (ODA) in the form of physical infrastructure, thereby subsidizing and generating business for Chinese contractors and suppliers. Using a novel firm-level dataset, I find that the Chinese government smoothens demand across state-owned firms in strategic sectors by allocating ODA projects to firms that face relatively lower, exogenous demand from other sources. As a placebo check, I show that unsubsidized official loans to the same set of countries and firms do not follow this pattern. I also address potential confounders at the home prefecture-, sector-, and recipient country-level and provide robustness to several other checks.
May 6, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarEilidh Geddes (Northwestern University): "Insurer Competition and Rating Areas on the ACA Exchanges"
May 5, 20205:30 PM - 6:30 PMOrientation for Economics Graduate Students on the Job MarketDiscussion of procedures for graduate students thinking about entering the job market next year
May 5, 20203:30 PM - 5:00 PMCANCELLED: Seminar in EconometricsStephane Bonhomme (University of Chicago): "Title TBD"
May 4, 20203:30 PM - 5:00 PMCANCELLED: Seminar in Industrial OrganizationGautam Gowrisankaran (University of Arizona): "Title TBD"
May 4, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMCANCELLED: Seminar in MacroeconomicsCharles Engel (University of Wisconsin): "Title TBD"
May 4, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarKelly Gail Strada (Northwestern University): "Premarital Testing and Family Structure"
May 1, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch SeminarGiampaolo Lecce (University of Groningen) - "Religiosity and Science (with Ogliari and Squicciarini)"    
May 1, 202011:30 AM - 12:00 PMMeeting for Third Year Economics Graduate StudentsMandatory meeting.  Director of Graduate Studies will discuss important deadlines, degree requirements and funding availability, and will answer questions.
May 1, 202011:00 AM - 11:30 AMMeeting for Second Year Economics Graduate StudentsMandatory meeting.  Director of Graduate Studies will discuss important deadlines, degree requirements and funding availability, and will answer questions.
April 30, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Federico Puglisi - "Title TBD"  
April 29, 20203:30 PM - 5:00 PMCANCELLED: Seminar in Economic HistoryDouglas Allen (Simon Fraser University): "Title TBD"
April 29, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch Seminar Ricardo Dahis (Northwestern University) - "Development via Autonomy and Funds: Evidence from Brazil" Abstract: Countries may promote regional development by allowing localities to self-select into emancipation and by providing intergovernmental grants to those who split. In large countries, where multiple districts exist within administrative units, the net benefits of splitting into a new unit may be largest for those that are physically isolated, rural, and poor. This paper tests this idea in the context of Brazil, where a window of opportunity between 1988-96 generated an increase of 24% in the number of municipalities. We first show that districts requesting to split are on average smaller, more rural and poorer than the rest of the country. Second, using as control group the districts that request to split but have their case denied, we show that splitting causes increases in agglomeration and night luminosity for new municipalities, but no effects on remaining districts. At the municipality level, splits cause (1) a spike in local capital investment, (2) steady growth in the bureaucracy size, (3) improvements in education and public services provision. Finally, we also estimate and discuss returns to fiscal investment via an IV exercise.  
April 29, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarEduardo Campillo Betancourt (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
April 28, 20204:00 PM - 5:30 PMCANCELLED: Susan Bies Lecture Presented by Darrell Duffie: "Financial Market Fragmentation"This event has been cancelled.  We hope to reschedule in the fall. --- The Susan Bies Lecture on Economics and Public Policy was launched in 2008 in honor of Northwestern alumna Susan Schmidt Bies. Bies, who earned her doctorate in economics from Northwestern University in 1972, served in various capacities during a long career, including on the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System from 2001 until 2007. The lecture alternates between microeconomic and macroeconomic topics. Darrell Duffie (Stanford): https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/faculty-research/faculty/darrell-duffie
April 27, 20203:30 PM - 5:00 PMCANCELLED: Seminar in Industrial OrganizationShoshana Vasserman (Harvard University): "Title TBD"
April 27, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMCANCELLED: Seminar in MacroeconomicsAlessandra Peter (Princeton University): "Owning Up: Closely Held Firms and Wealth Inequality"
April 27, 202012:00 PM - 12:45 PMMatthias Doepke (Economics/IPR) - The Impact of COVID-19 on Gender Equality."The Impact of COVID-19 on Gender Equality" by Matthias Doepke, HSBC Research Professor of Economics and IPR Associate The Spring 2020 IPR Monday Fay Lomax Cook (FLC) Colloquium Series will be held online using Zoom.  Northwestern faculty, staff, and students: Please be sure to log into Zoom using your authenticated Northwestern netid and password (Sign In with SSO). This will allow you to enter the colloquium directly at 11:50 a.m. CDT.  If you are signed in as a guest or on a personal account, this might cause delays in admitting you to the colloquium. __________________________________________________________ No Northwestern netid? External participants are required to register for this colloquium here and cannot join without having registered by 10:00 a.m. CDT on Monday, April 27. If you have already registered for this or other IPR talks, you do not need to do so again. To avoid delays in admitting you to the colloquium, please be sure to use the same first name and last name that you used to register when you join the colloquium in Zoom. __________________________________________________________ Please make sure that you are running the latest version of Zoom.    
April 27, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarBoli Xu (Northwestern University): "A Dynamic Model of Free Riding"
April 24, 20202:00 PM - 3:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarSiu Hong Lee (Northwestern University): "Building sustainable school-based agricultural extesion systems: Randomized Experiment(s) in rural Liberia"
April 24, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch SeminarYiling Zhao (Northwestern University) "Home Economics and Women’s Path to Science "    
April 23, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMWaldron Connections Program: Recent Graduate PanelStudents will hear from young women who recently graduated from Northwestern. These alumnae will talk more about their experiences at Northwestern, how they picked their majors and career paths, and they will talk more about what they do in their work today. You won't want to miss their insights and advice about how to take advantage of your time at Northwestern to explore different career options!
April 23, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMMacroeconomics Lunch Seminar Jane Olmstead - Rumsey - "Title TBD"  
April 22, 20203:30 PM - 5:00 PMCANCELLED: Seminar in Economic HistoryFelipe Valencia Caicedo (Vancouver School of Economics): “Trust Unraveled: The Long Shadow of the Spanish Civil War”
April 22, 20202:00 PM - 3:00 PMWaldron Connections Program: Featured Career Talk with Junta Nakai '04Students will hear from Junta Nakai '04 (Economics) who leads Financial Services at Databricks and spends a lot of time thinking about and working with customers who are defining the future of finance. He is also a part-owner of Brooklyn Kura, the first Sake Brewery in New York and the biggest craft sake brand in America.
April 22, 20201:00 PM - 2:00 PMDevelopment Economics Lunch Seminar Alison Andrew (UCL, IFS) - "Preferences and Beliefs in the Marriage Market for Young Brides" joint work with Abi Adams-Prassl (University of Oxford)   Abstract: Rajasthani women typically leave school early and marry young. We develop a novel discrete choice methodology using hypothetical vignettes to elicit average parental preferences over a daughter's education and age of marriage, and subjective beliefs about the evolution of her marriage market prospects. We find parents have a strong preference for delaying a daughter's marriage until eighteen but no further. Conditional on a marriage match, parents place little intrinsic value on a daughter's education. However, they believe the probability of receiving a good marriage offer increases strongly with a daughter's education but deteriorates quickly with her age on leaving school. 
April 22, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarAleksandra Paluszynska (Northwestern University): "What I used to want: the effect of cognitive decline on health care utilization at the end of life"
April 21, 20203:30 PM - 5:00 PMCANCELLED: Seminar in EconometricsVira Semenova (Harvard University): "Title TBD"
April 21, 202012:00 PM - 1:00 PMWaldron Connections Program: Alumni Panel on Working in PolicyStudents will hear from alumni who work in health care, education, and public policy. Alumni will talk about their time at Northwestern along with the impactful classes and mentors who helped them find their way to policy work.
April 20, 20203:30 PM - 5:00 PMCANCELLED: Seminar in Industrial OrganizationChris Neilson (Princeton University): "Title TBD"
April 20, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMCANCELLED: Seminar in MacroeconomicsThomas Winberry (University of Chicago Booth School of Business): "The Investment Network, Sectoral Comovement, and the Changing U.S. Business Cycle" (Joint with Christian vom Lehn)
April 20, 202011:00 AM - 12:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarSantiago Camara (Northwestern University): "Title TBD"
April 17, 20202:00 PM - 3:00 PMEconomics 501: Graduate Student SeminarUdayan Vaidya (Northwestern University): "Experts ExPost Information"
April 17, 202012:00 PM - 1:30 PMEconomic History Lunch SeminarNatalya Naumenko - "Was the 1933 Soviet Famine a Genocide? We know so Much and we Still Can’t Tell"